Miscellaneous

Updated Wing Wizard

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Long time since I’ve posted anything but I’ve been busy painting. So glad I built these wing racks, made working in this small garage so much easier.

The first wing wizard worked ok, after using it a few times I realized it needed some improvements. To start with the base needed to have less flex in it. So I used a 4×4 for the main cross piece and some 1×4 for the caster supports. A 4×4 was way Overkill but it was cheap and simple. Besides the extra weight adds some stability.

Notched end for 1x4
Notched end for 1×4
Add vertical support to the caster arms
Add vertical support to the caster arms
Padded wing cradle
Padded wing cradle
Lock pin to secure strap
Lock pin to secure strap
Strap laced into carpet
Strap laced into carpet

2″ PVC was used to connect the two bases, the bottom tee was notched to allow the rotation of the bases. The base was drilled in the center and a piece of PVC was inserted to fit up into the tee.

When rotating the wing, locking the wing in place is easy with the cam lock nuts from Rockwell.

To raise and lower each side I purchased a couple trailer jacks from HarborFreight and mounted them with some exhaust pipe clamps. Don’t get tempted to get a square tubing jack, you want the arm to rotate so you don’t have to remove the arm to clear the struts.

To hold the wing some soft carpet was combined with 2″ tie down straps to create a nice cradle less likely to damage the wing than the previous design.

Wing gently cradled by the carpet
Wing gently cradled by the carpet

Both wings easily store in my one car garage.

Wings stored in garage
Wings stored in garage

I did write down all the dimensions but have not taken the time to post it all here. The bases have the same measurements so should not be hard to figure it out from my original design. If you are interested in this information leave a comment, might motivate me to make a more detailed post.

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Lonesome Buzzard Wing Wizard 3000

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Installing the wings, even with a helper, is a pain. While I can do it alone and it’s not that time consuming it can be frustrating and it’s really easy to damage the wings moving them around. I’ve been wanting to make this process easier since I built my wing carriers long ago and I finally came up with an idea that works!

I’ve basically built a set of sawhorses, on wheels, that transforms into a wing rack while the wing is resting on the sawhorses. Watch the video to see it in action:

Now, time to start building this, your gonna need some materials:

Qty Material Length Description
2 2″ PVC pipe 62-1/2″ Main horizontal support
2 2″ PVC Pipe 12″ Main vertical support
2 2″ PVC pipe 1-3/4″ Reducer connector
2 2″ PVC pipe 3-1/2″ Rotator for base
2 1.5″ PVC pipe 25″ Vertical slider
1.5″ PVC pipe 6″ Arm rotator
2 1.5″ PVC pipe 20″ Lower arm
2 1.5″ PVC pipe 28″ Upper Arm
6 1.5″ PVC pipe 1-3/4″ 45° connectors
2 1.5″ PVC pipe 3-3/4″ Bungee holder
2 3/4″ PVC pipe 3-1/2″ Bungee hook
2 3/4″ PVC cap N/A Bungee hook
2 2″ PVC 4-way N/A
2 2″ PVC Tee N/A
2 2″ to 1-1/2″ PVC reducer N/A
2 3″ sch 30 cap N/A Mount to base
2 3″ to 2″ sch 30 bushing N/A Mount to base rotator
8 1-1/2″ PVC 45° elbow N/A
4 1-1/2″ PVC cap N/A
4 1-1/2″ PVC Tee N/A Arm rotator assembly
6 Wing Nuts N/A Replacement wing nuts for lawnmower handles
8 3″ casters N/A All must be casters, preferably locking too.
32 5/16-18X1″ carriage bolts and nuts N/A Attach casters
?? Various small screws N/A
6 1×4 common board 44″ Base
4 1×4 common board 18″ Attach casters
2 1×4 common board 56″ Attach casters
2  bungee cord 4′ Flat cord bungee

Note: Do not use “sanitary” fittings, they will not work.

Many of the PVC parts will need modified, a lathe would make most of the modifications easier. A mill would be nice too. I used a Dremel and a drill press.

Let’s start at the bottom and work out way up. 

The ends of two 44″ boards need notched to accept the 18″ boards. The notch in the 18″ boards starts 4″ from the end. I glued the there pieces together.

The rear two 44″ boards have a small notch cut in them to clear the 18″ boards. This board was glued and screwed to the back side of the platform.

The front 44″ board also needs notched but it needs to be lower. This board was added as a modification so some pictures might be missing it.

Before gluing this board I pre-tensioned it with some twist to counteract the off-center weight when the wing is in the storage position.


Modified base to prevent leaning
Modified base to prevent leaning

If your wondering why the board is pre-tensioned look at the picture below.

Tensioned platform vs non-tensioned platform
Tensioned platform vs non-tensioned platform

The casters are bolted to corners and the 3″ PVC cap is bolted in the middle.

This picture was taken before I added the front board in the previous step
This picture was taken before I added the front board in the previous step

Grab the two 2″ tees and cut a notch for the wing bolt that goes 90°. It is ok to go more than 90 but if you can make it exactly 90 you will be happier with the end result. Remember to make a right and left version, the tees should be mirrors if one another.

Now grind out the inside of the notched part of the tee until a 2″ pipe can easily rotate within the tee. Now glue the 3-1/2″ long 2″ pipe into the 3″ to 2″ reducer. Once the glue is dry insert it into the tee, ensure it freely rotates when fully inserted. Now mark the center of the notch onto the pipe. Drill a hole, use a small chisel to make the hole square for the carriage bolt.

The carriage bolts for the wing nuts need modified a little bit to better match the contour of the pipe. A vice and a file made this pretty easy.

Grab the 12″ long 2″ pipes. Cut a slot in them, this will be the height adjustment.  I used my drill press to drill a line of holes then used a file to produce what you see here.

Grind out the inside of the two 2″ to 1-1/2″ reducers until a 1-1/2″ pipe easily slides through the adapter.

You can now assemble the main part of the base.

Set the PVC base into the caps. Now adjust the base rotation wing nuts. The vertical boards on each caster platform should be facing each other.

Once adjusted to your liking use some small screws to attach the reducer and cap.
Now get two of the 1-1/2″ tees and notch them for the wing nut. Again remember​ to make a right and left.  The length of the slot is not too important, I made mine much more than 90° but depending on how much rotation you need you might want to do something different.

Now grind out the inside of the tee until a 1-1/2″ pipe easily rotate inside the tee.  Go ahead and glue the 25″ 1-1/2″ pipes to the tees. You might be tempted to cut square hole for the adjuster, but wait till later when you can better align everything first.

Now take the remaining PVC parts and build two candy canes, again be sure to make a right and left.

The 1-1/2″ long PVC pipe needs a notch cut in it so the bungee cord can exit the pipe. The “cap” will slide over the end and is secured with two small screws.

Notched four bungee cord
Notched four bungee cord

A board was cut to create a flat platform for the bottom of the wing. I used a 2.5″ hike saw to notch the end and a 45° bevel wad added with the router. 

The board was drilled and counter sunk then attached with some drywall screws I had laying around.  Then it was covered with some self adhesive pipe insulation. 

Pipe insulation to prevent scratches
Pipe insulation to prevent scratches
Pipe insulation to prevent scratches
Pipe insulation to prevent scratches

To adjust the tension on the bungee, wrap the cord around the hook before inserting it into the pipe. I did need to bend the hook a little too make it narrow enough to fit into the pipe.

Now you can assemble everything and mark the locations for the adjusting bolts.

Ignition Wire Safety

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The manual for my Hirth F-33 engine says that if it is mounted inverted the spark plug wires need to be secured so they cannot fall off​ from vibration and gravity. After inquiring on the lonesomebuzzards.com forums George and Dick gave me what I thought was the best idea.

Purchased two s-clips and a 1/4″ diameter by 6″ long spring from the hardware store. Added a scrap piece of fuel tubing to prevent the spring from chafing the ignition wires. Drilled a couple of holes in the cylinder head fins and voila, problem solved.

Hirth F-33 sparkplug wire safety spring
Hirth F-33 sparkplug wire safety spring

Bolt Length

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A few weeks ago I ran across an article taking about aircraft bolts that answered lots of questions I had. One thing that concerned me on my airplane is that some of the bolts appeared to be too short. Turns out I was right, some of the bolt sizes on the plans are wrong according to general aviation practices. I suspect this was done to save weight.

The article mentioned above suggested that there should be at most one thread inside the hole, the bolt must go all the way through the nut but if there are more than three threads through the nut the bolt might be too long. I also looked up what the FAA says which is in AC 43.13-1B chapter 7.

7-37. GRIP LENGTH. In general, bolt grip lengths of a fastener is the thickness of the material the fastener is designed to hold when two or more parts are being assembled.

…………

All bolt installations which involve self-locking or plain nuts should have at least one thread of the bolt protruding through the nut.

FAA AC43.13-1B

Armed with proper knowledge I looked at the bolts holding the aileron brackets. As you can see the AN3-6 the plans call for are too short.

The bolt does not have at least one thread protruding through the nut.
The bolt does not have at least one thread protruding through the nut.

Not only is the overall length of the bolt too short it’s grip length is too short. More than one thread is in the hole, this could allow the bolt too be overtightened crushing the wood.

I also would feel much safer with those bolts safety wired so I ordered up some AN3-7 with drilled heads. With the AN3-7 one thread protrudes through the nut.

One thread is protruding through the nut

With drilled heads I can safety wire the bolts ensuring my aileron will remain attached.

Drilled head on aileron bracket bolt
Drilled head on aileron bracket bolt

N-349LE

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I decided awhile back that if I ended up overweight for part 103 rules that I would register it as an experimental amateur built aircraft. Not only am I overweight but also a bit tail heavy so last week I paid the FAA $10 to reserve my custom N number, N349LE aka Eagle.

Registering as EAB allows me to carry more fuel so I ordered up two wing tanks and plan to ditch the fuselage tank. The fuselage tank and my toes don’t get along and I never liked the idea of 5 gallons of gas above my legs ready to turn my bird into a crematorium.

Once the wing tanks are installed I can start putting the fabric and paint on the wings. Won’t be too much longer and the airplane will be completed.

November and December progress

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Winter has slowed down progress on the painting. I’ve been trying different paint methods and plan to post an article detailing what I think works best. The paint scheme will be revealed when it’s completed but here are a couple of pics showing that it is possible to get a showroom finish with latex paint.

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Vertical fin with high gloss latex
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Landing gear leg

Static Ports

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Before covering the tail section of the fuselage I thought it would be a good idea to build some static ports and run the tubing. The flight manual says to put the static ports in the center of the diagonal between stations six and seven.

I cut a 3/4″ cube from some scrap wood and drilled a 19/64″ hole through the center. Then used a 11/32 to drill nearly all the way through leaving about 1/8″ of the 19/64″ hole.

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Static port block

I then put some CA ( super glue ) on the 19/64″ portion of the hole. Once dry I run a 1/8-27 NPT tap through the hole. As the tap cut I would remove it, add more CA, let it dry and then tap a little deeper. The end result is some nice strong threads in the block.

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Static port block with threads

Next I cut a 1 1/2″ square piece of 1/8″ plywood and drilled a 19/64″ hole in the center.

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Static port base

Next I used the 19/64″ drill bit to line up the block and plywood to glue them together.

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Now the hose adapter can be installed so you can get an idea of the final result.

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Static port assembly
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Static port assembly

The plug on the outside is some fastener I found at the local hardware store. To make them useful I drilled a 1/16″ hole in the center.

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1/16" hole for static port

I glued the assembly in the center of the diagonal between stations six and seven.

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Attached static port to fuselage

Once the glue was set I vanished the exposed wood then started running the tubing. I put a tee between the two ports.

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Static port tee and tubing

Drilled a hole in the elevator cable bracket on station six to hold the tubing.

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Tubing support

Did the same at station five and a hole was drilled in station four directly under the left rudder cable.

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Tubing support

Another hole was drilled in the seat support directly above the elevator trim cable.

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The tube follows the same path as the trim cable up behind the instruments. I did not connect it to the instruments yet because I have not decided on the exact routing behind the dash so no pictures of that. The plan is to add tee so it can be connected to the air speed indicator and altimeter.

Wing Carriers

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Working in a single car garage is less than ideal but so far I’ve made sure. When I got both wings completed I ended up with one hanging on the wall and the other one occupying my workbench making it difficult to work on anything.

So I decided to build some wing carriers to make it easier to move and store the wings. They need to be light, capable of spring the wing and allow the wings to be hung up side by side without strut brackets poking holes in the other wing.

The basic idea is three J shaped verticals connected with with three horizontal bars, two on back and one on the front. This is the bottom of the J.

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Here is the completed assembly.

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Both wings safely hanging on the wall.

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The nice thing about these is I can pick a wing up by myself, lay wing onto saw horses and remove the carrier with no trouble. Putting the carrier back on is also really easy. Might be helpful for anyone who trailers their bird too.

To attach, place the carrier on the leading edge.

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Hook the bungee cords.

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Rotate vertical

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Carry away

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Materials needed to make one carrier:
3 pieces 6′ X 1/2″ electrical conduit
Some self taping sheet metal screws
1/2″ and 3/4″ pipe insulation, enough to cover all the pipes
3 pieces 8″ X 3/4″ schedule 40 pvc pipe
5 pieces 12″ X 3/4″ schedule 40 pvc pipe
1 piece 11″ X 3/4″ schedule 40 pvc pipe
2 pieces 43″ X 3/4″ schedule 40 pvc pipe
1 piece 42″ X 3/4″ schedule 40 pvc pipe
6 pieces 3/4″ 90° slip elbow
2 pieces 3/4″ slip to 1/2″ Male threaded
2 pieces 1/2″ threaded tee
1 piece four way slip
2 3/4″ slip plug with 1/2″ female threads
4 pieces 3/4″ slip to 1/2″ female threads 90° elbow
2 pieces 3/4″ slip tee with center 1/2″ threaded
3 pieces 4′ bungee cord

The 1/2″ threaded is for the electrical conduit, you need to grind the threads a little for the pipe to slide in. The screws prevent the pipes from sliding out.

Rear spar carry through

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When I first fit the wings I messed up when I drilled the 1/4″ holes to 3/8″ and glued the RS-401 aluminum bushing in place. It seems difficult to keep the drill perfectly straight. The grain of the wood will push the bit toward the softer areas. So I ended up drillng the holes out to 1/2″ and gluing a dowel in the hole so I can start over.

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This time I have a plan to ensure the hole is straight. I took a scrap piece of 2×4 and drilled a 3/8″ hole through it on the drill press. As you can see the aluminum tube fits perfect inside the 3/8″ hole.

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After installing the wings and drilling the 1/4″ hole I put the 1/4″ pin in the hole and slid the aluminum tube/2×4 over the pin.

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Next the 2×4 was clamped to the rear spar carry through.

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The tube and pin were removed and then the 3/8″ hole drilled through the 2×4 into the carry through. The 2×4 held the 3/8″ drill bit perfectly straight. I am much happier with the results now.

Metal Fabrication

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The aileron horns are cut from the same piece as the aileron yoke and rudder horn. I figured that I might as well cut them all out. Then I started making other metal parts related to the other items. The result is now the control stick assembly is completed.

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Really no need to go into much detail as all these parts are pretty easy to make. One issue I had was cutting the 1″ hole in the yoke and torque tube bearings. Using a 3/4″ hole saw, a dremel and most importantly my rounded file. If this file was shaped like a rod, it would be 1″ diameter. Without that file it would have been more difficult to get a nearly perfect hole.

You can see how perfect this file fit this hole.

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Here are the aileron, ruder and elevator horns.

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